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There is debate over what extent lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transgender people, intersexed people, and others share common interests and a need to work together.

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Evidently, even though most of these people would say that they stand for the same values as the majority of the community, there are still remaining inconsistencies even within the LGBTIQ community.LGBT movements have often adopted a kind of identity politics that sees gay, bisexual and transgender people as a fixed class of people; a minority group or groups, and this is very common among LGBT communities.In 1791, France became the first nation to decriminalize homosexuality, probably thanks in part to Jean Jacques Régis de Cambacérès, who was one of the authors of the Napoleonic Code.With the introduction of the Napoleonic Code in 1808, the Duchy of Warsaw also decriminalized homosexuality.Roffee and Waling (2016) discovered that LGBTIQ people experience microaggressions, bullying and anti-social behaviours from other people within the LGBTIQ community.

This is due to misconceptions and conflicting views as to what entails "LGBTIQ".For example, transgender people found that other members of the community were not understanding to their own, individual, specific needs and would instead make ignorant assumptions, and this can cause health risks.Additionally, bisexual people found that lesbian or gay people were not understanding or appreciative of the bisexual sexuality.As a result, many of those countries retained their statutes on sodomy until late in the 20th century.In eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe, same-sex sexual behaviour and cross-dressing were widely considered to be socially unacceptable, and were serious crimes under sodomy and sumptuary laws. For example, in the 17th century cross dressing was common in plays, as evident in the content of many of William Shakespeare's plays and by the actors in actual performance (since female roles in Elizabethan theater were always performed by males, usually prepubescent boys)." Social reformer Jeremy Bentham wrote the first known argument for homosexual law reform in England around 1785, at a time when the legal penalty for buggery was death by hanging.